“From your Valentine…”

Every year at this time, the windows and display shelves of department stores and gift shops in many places around the world are adorned with cardboard hearts and Cupids armed with bow and arrow.

Then, on February 14, candy, flowers, and other gifts are exchanged by loved ones*, all in the name of St. Valentine. And it’s big business, too! According to the U.S. census board, American consumers spend US$448 million on valentine’s chocolates alone. But, who is this mysterious Saint Valentine, and how did he come to represent love and romance (and how did these traditions come to be part of modern culture)?

There are several legends explaining the origins of Valentine’s Day, and the most popular of these dates back to Ancient Rome. The Catholic Church recognizes at least three Saints named Valentine (or Valentinus), all of whom were martyred. One legend claims that Valentine was a priest who lived in Rome during the third century. Believing that single men made better soldiers than those with wives, the Emperor outlawed marriage for young men. Valentine, however, opposed this decree and defied the authorities by continuing to secretly perform marriage ceremonies for young lovers. Unfortunately for Valentine and the many young couples hoping to get married, his actions were discovered and he was sentenced to death.

An alternative story contends that Valentine may have been killed for helping Christians escape persecution. The story goes that while in jail awaiting his execution, Valentine was visited often by a young girl, possibly his jailer’s daughter. Valentine fell in love with this girl and, apparently, sent her the very first “valentine” greeting. On the night before his death, he wrote a letter to her and signed it, “From your Valentine.” This expression is still in use today.

Later, at the end of the fifth century, Pope Gelasius declared February 14 St. Valentine’s Day. And, although the origins of Valentine’s Day will remain unclear, the stories all emphasize Valentine’s appeal as a heroic and romantic figure. And despite the commercialization, it remains a day for the romantic.

*The tradition differs here in Japan where only ladies give men presents on Valentine’s Day. Men get to give presents to ladies in return one month later on March 14th, White Day.

Adrian

毎年この時期になると、世界中のデパートやお店の多くの場所で、ハートや弓矢を持ったキューピッドが飾られます。

2月14日に、キャンディや、花と他の贈り物などは、愛される者たち*(聖バレンタインの名においたすべて)によって交換されます。これはかなりの大きなビジネスです!米国国勢調査によると、アメリカの消費者は、バレンタインカードのチョコレートだけで約4億4800万ドルを使います。

しかし、この不可解な聖バレンタインとは誰なのでしょうか、また、彼はどのようにして愛とロマンス(そして、この伝統はどのようにして現代文化の一部となったのでしょうか)の代表になったのでしょうか?

バレンタインデーの原点を説明している伝説はいくつかありますが、これらの日付で最も人気のあるものは古代ローマのものです。カトリック教会は少なくとも3人のバレンタイン(またはバレンチヌス)という名の聖人を認めています。それらの人は全て迫害されています。

伝説の1つでは、バレンタインは3世紀の間、ローマに住んでいた聖職者であったと主張しています。独身男性の方が、妻のいる男性より、より良い兵士を作ったと信じ、天皇は青年のために結婚を非合法化しました。しかし、バレンタインはこの法に反対して、若いカップルたちのために、ひそかに結婚式を行い続けて法を無視していました。

バレンタインと、結婚を望む多くの若いカップルにとって残念なことに、彼の行動が見つかり、そして彼は死刑を宣告されてしまいました。

キリスト教徒の迫害から守るために、バレンタインが死んだかもしれないという記事もあります。その話では、刑務所で自分の処刑を待つ間、バレンタインの所にしばしば女の子(おそらく彼の看守の娘)が訪ねていたそうです。
バレンタインはこの女の子と恋に落ちて、彼女に明らかに一番最初の「バレンタインカード」の挨拶を送りました。彼の死の前夜、彼女に手紙を書いて「あなたのバレンタインから」とサインをしました。
この表現が今もまだ使われているのです。

後の5世紀の終わりに、Gelasius法王は、2月14日をバレンタインデーと宣言しました。
そして、バレンタインデーの原点が不明なままではありますが、この話はバレンタインが英雄的でロマンチックな人物であることを強調しています。
そして、商業化されておりますが、この日はロマンチックな日となっているのです。

*日本では異なる伝統があり、女性がバレンタインデーに男性にプレゼントをおくる日となっています。男性は、1カ月後の3月14日(ホワイトデー)に女性にお返しをあげるようになっています。

エイドリアン