An exhausting meal

Last month, taking advantage of an invitation to a party, I went down to Morioka in Iwate Prefecture. When my friend found out this was my first visit to Tohoku ever, he insisted that I try as many local specialties as I could in 24 hours. We started off with a bowl of reimen, later followed by Fukuda-pan and a variety of sweet and salty snacks typical of the Morioka area.

The culinary experience culminated with a meal at a famous wanko soba restaurant. Having never heard of wanko soba, I assumed it was just another variety of those thin Japanese noodles. I started having doubts when the waitress gave us a box full of little wooden sticks like toothpicks or matches which, she explained, we were supposed to use to keep count. “Keep count of what?” I thought. The waitress went on talking for a couple more minutes. She was speaking rather fast so I couldn’t quite understand everything she was saying although it was clear she was basically telling us how to eat our noodles. “How hard can it be?” I wondered. The one thing I got was that we weren’t supposed to drink the broth in order to avoid getting full too quickly. And the waitress pointed to a bucket on the table in which the broth ought to be discarded.

At that point, I was quite confused about the whole process so I decided to just watch my friend and imitate him. You know what they say: “When in Rome…”And that’s when the meal really started. Or should I say the race. The waitress brought a tray with 20 little bowls each containing one mouthful of soba. My friend raised his bowl towards the waitress who poured one of the mini portions into it. I watched my friend as he unceremoniously gulped his first bowlful and reached out his bowl for the waitress to refill. 30 seconds later, when I finally decided to start, my friend was already working on his fourth serving. We knocked back our soba for the next half hour at a frantic pace. As soon as I had finished a portion, the waitress was already ready to give me the next one. Everything was going so incredibly fast that I hardly had time to try all the condiments that had been laid on the table, let alone take a sip of my beer.

When we finally decided we had had enough, I felt relieved…and exhausted! It was established – I’m not sure how because I had completely lost track of count despite the little ‘matches’ – that both my friend and I had eaten 77 servings each (about 5 regular portions of soba). Although I enjoyed discovering a new way of eating soba, I found the sheer pace of the meal a little stressful. But if you’ve never had wanko-soba, you definitely ought to try it once.

Seba

先月、パーティに招待され岩手県の盛岡市に出かけました。これが私の初めての東北旅行と知ると、友達は地元の食べ物に挑戦してみるよう勧めてきました。そこで、冷麺からスタートし、福田パンやその他盛岡地方の様々なスイーツやスナックを食べまくりました。

この食べまくりツアーは、わんこそばのお店でクライマックスを迎えました。“わんこそば”というものが何か知らなかったので、単なる麺料理の一種なのだろうくらいに思っていましたが、ウェイトレスに爪楊枝のような小さな木の棒がたくさん入った箱を渡されたところで疑問が湧いてきました。彼女の説明では、その棒はカウントするために必要だと。「カウント・・?何を?」心の中で思いました。彼女は早口で話し続けていたので、全部は聞き取れなかったのですが、わんこそばの食べ方を説明していることは分かりました。「何がそんなに大変なの・・?」不思議に思いました。一つだけ理解できたのは、早く満腹にならないために汁は飲んではいけないということです。テーブルの横には汁を捨てるためのバケツが用意されていました。

何がなんだかよくわからなかったので、とりあえず友達の真似をしてやってみることにしました。“郷に入れば郷に従え”です。ウェイトレスは20コ程のお椀を乗せたトレイを持ってきました。そのお椀の中には、一口で食べられる量のそばが入って、友達がウェイトレスに向かってお椀を差し出すと、彼女はお椀の中にそばを流し入れました。すると友達は無造作に飲み込み、おかわりをしました。それを見て自分もやってみようとしたときには、友達はすでに4杯目を食べていました。その後30分間そばを食べ続けました。そばを口に入れるか入れないうちに、ウェイトレスは次のそばを入れる準備をしています。全てがすごい速さで進んでいくので、目の前にある薬味やビールを味わう暇さえありませんでした。

やっと満腹になった時には、ホっとしつつもクタクタになっていました。結果はというと、友達と私はそれぞれ77杯(普通のそば5杯分)でした。新しいそばの食べ方を発見したわけですが、若干苦痛でした。もし、わんこそばを食べたことがなければ、是非挑戦してみてください。

セバ