A Camera Quandary

Recently, I passed a street entertainer while walking in the city. I had some time, so I decided to watch his show. As he finished a rather impressive juggling routine, I noticed something quite shocking - nobody was applauding! In fact, everyone else had their faces hidden in their phones! They were more concerned with taking a picture of the performer than actually enjoying his performance!

There are more cameras today than ever before, which means more pictures are being taken than ever before. And with gigabytes of memory, we don’t need to worry about taking too many. But is that a good thing?

I read some wonderful advice online about when to take, and when NOT to take, a photo. It made me rethink how I used my camera. Since then, come up with my own simple rules for camera use that I would like to share!

1) Make sure the image is really worth capturing 
Or put another way, “Will I ever look at this photo again?” It’s a simple question, yes, but the most important one. I often find my answer is, “No!” So, rather than worrying about finding the right angle or trying to get my camera to focus, I just enjoy the moment.

2) Ask yourself, “Can I find this picture online?” 
I used to take many pictures of famous locations, but then I realized there was no point. Unless, you are an avid photographer looking for a special shot, you can find hundreds of (better) pictures online. Again, perhaps it’s better to actually experience the place than trying to capture it.

3) Try to include a person. 
I always try to include a friend or family in any photos I take. A picture of a nice garden is wonderful, but a picture of a good friend enjoying the garden is even better! Having someone in the picture makes it more meaningful and later, it can help you remember when and where you took it. I have many pictures of cities at night, but I can't for the life of me remember where or when I took them! Seeing a friendly face would solve that problem.

4) Limit your time 
When I actually decide that something is picture-worthy, I always limit the amount of time spent snapping the photo! If it's worthy capturing on film, it's worth appreciating in the moment. Take the photo and put the camera away. A photo is supposed to be a quick snapshot, so I try to keep it that way!

Well, those are my four basic rules for taking photos! I hope they have given you some food for thought. These days, I take far less photos, and honestly, I don't really miss them. In fact, I feel like I actually experience far more than I did before.

Emilio

最近、街を歩いていると路上パフォーマンスをしている人を見かけました。時間があったので少し足を止めて観てみることにしました。素晴らしいジャグリングショーの後、衝撃的な事に気付きました。誰も彼に拍手を送っていなかったのです!拍手の代わりにみんな携帯電話を高く掲げ、写真撮影をしていたのです。パフォーマンスよりも写真を撮ることに夢中になっていました。

今日では、カメラの普及率はとても高くなり、写真が沢山撮られるようになりました。メモリーも大容量で、何枚でも気軽に撮れます。これは果たしていいことなのでしょうか?
写真を撮る時、また撮るべきではない時を判断する、いいアドバイス記事をネットで読みました。これを読んで私の写真の撮り方が変わり、それ以来写真を撮るときに自分の中でルールを決めることにしました。それをここで少し紹介したいと思います。

1)撮影する価値があるか見極める。
言い換えると、「この写真、自分はまた見返すだろうか?」と問うことです。シンプル且つ最も重要な問いです。大体この質問に私の場合、「No!」が当てはまります。良いアングルやカメラのフォーカスを気にするより、その場を楽しんだ方がいいのです。

2) この写真はネットで見つけられる?
有名スポットの写真を何枚も取っていた時期がありましたが、今ではそれは意味がないと気付いたのです。写真愛好家で特別なスポットを探しているという人には話は別ですが、そうでなければネットで何百枚と良い写真を見つけることが出来ます(しかも自分で撮るよりももっと素敵かも?)。そしてこの場合も、写真に収めるよりも実際にその地を自ら体験する方がいいのです。

3) 人と撮るようにする。
いつも友達や家族と一緒に撮るように心がけています。綺麗なガーデンの写真はもちろん素敵ですが、仲の良い友達がガーデンで楽しんでいる一枚を撮る方が、更に素敵な写真になります。誰かと一緒に撮った方が、後で見返した時にいつ・どこで撮影したか思い出せます。色々な街での夜景写真を撮りましたが、いつどこで撮られたものなのか、いつも全く思い出せません。ですが友達の笑顔が写っていれば、あっという間にこの問題は解決です。

4) 時間を制限する。
この瞬間は写真に収めるべき!と決めたとき、いつも撮影時間を制限するようにします。カメラに収める必要があるなら、実際にその瞬間を楽しむ必要があるということです。写真を撮ったら、カメラをしまいましょう。写真は本来、手早いスナップショットであるのが本来の用途です。

この4つが私の写真を撮る時の基本的なルールです。皆さんもこれを機に写真の撮り方について是非考えてみて下さい。最近では、昔ほど写真は撮らなくなりましたが、それで今は全く問題ないです。実際には、以前よりももっと多くのことを経験出来ているように思います。

エミリオ